Track By Track With Pork Pie


By Kieran Webber

Pork Pie are one of the UK’s most exciting Post-Punk bands operating at the moment, with a contagious inventiveness throughout their music it is hard not to be drawn in. Although a young band Pork Pie are already leaving a dent in the UK music scene and their most recent EP ‘Post Maudlin’ is sure to turn heads.

Their sound dances in the atmosphere of punk with an almost orchestral presence, each element of their music comes crashing down on you like wave. It’s an exciting time in the UK with bands such as Pork Pie rising into existence, we look forward to seeing what else the chaps can achieve.

With their release date just gone by we got the chaps to explain to us the EP track by track. We strongly recommend you listen to the EP whilst you read. You can order it from Breakfast Records here.

Listen to the EP in full here.

‘Hallow Guitar’

Hallow Guitar kicks off the EP as our introduction to our new material. There is not much to say about this little song just that our parents think it’s too shouty.

‘Fruit Machine’

Fruit machine details the feeling of taking one step forward and two steps back and coming to terms with your own lack of content in life.

‘Your Side’

Your side keeps it short and sweet. We experimented with some fruitier notes on this song. The song is quite self explanatory and sings about the paranoia of waiting around for someone.

‘Dinner and Wine’

Dinner and Wine is a song about being unable to find a voice when everything around you is sinking. That helpless feeling of an emerging fracture within a family, the frustration it embodies and the dysfunction that later ensues.

‘Idolise the Idle’

Idolise the Idle is a cathartic release of observations from the perspective of a privileged, middle class upbringing. It’s the anecdotes and mundanities of day to day life such as: watching the news and taking the bins out. The modern life can be so abrasive, and this song is the perfect counterpoint – a cynical exploration of being overwhelmed by the bare minimum.


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