Jeanie Jailer
Jeanie Jailer

Jeanie Jailer is the writer obsessed with all things 70’s, glam and glittery. Whilst relatively new to the reviewing world, she’s keen to sing your praises.

Rating: 4.5 out of 5.

Label: Self-Released

The half French, half English indie funk band Sourface have released their fabulous new EP ‘Daytime’s Past’ with an eclectic range of influences from the likes of Serge Gainsbourg to the Beach Boys.

The first thing that strikes you when listening to this EP is just how much fun it is, you can’t help but want to groove to it. Absolutely drenched from start to finish in sunshine-y 60’s vibes, you’re totally left wanting more and with such a range of genres/influences there is something for everyone here, although you’ll struggle not to love it all! 

‘Entre Inconnus’ is the perfect punchy funk song that sounds like it’s been plucked straight out of a Guy Ritchie movie (that’s a great thing by the way). Starting straight off the cuff with a lone raw guitar riff which then carries throughout the song, a fleeting shaker introduces the drums and vivacious vocals quickly after. A perfect feature that is quintessentially funk is the keys that throughout the song are relatively understated but give it that timeless flair. As the song builds you really begin to feel the personality of the band in full force.

‘Déjà La Veille’ the second French spoken song from the EP is a much softer track, beautiful and dreamy, you can imagine the sun beaming down on you whilst you drive along the Côte d’Azur. With a super smooth bass line and sweet synth melody it carries like a fond memory of summers past.

‘To The Woods’ reminds me of songs by Belle and Sebastian with it’s candid and humorous nature. The song is introduced by a bright, acoustic guitar which is swiftly joined by percussion and keys. In this track the vocals really light it up with Ludo’s distinctive lead and the twinkly backing vocals that really help to create the band’s unique sound. Towards the middle of the song there is a beautiful, swirling instrumental section which is accented with fun, B-52’s-esque screams. A favourite moment is when the music stops before the last chorus, you hear a little laugh and apology, which hints at the band’s playful disposition.

This band could be compared to an innumerable amount of artists but somehow remain impossible to pin down. ‘Daytimes Past’ is a wonderfully kooky collection of songs, full of passion and consistently goes from strength to strength with retrospective elements whilst still feeling wholly brand new. It truly stands as a great introduction into the musical minds of Sourface